Protecting children from sexual predators

In light of the devastating events that allegedly took place at Penn State and Syracuse Universities, we now see fresh evidence of horrific child sexual abuse that continues to be all too prevalent in our society. How many children have been violated and are living with horrible emotions, too frightened to come forward? Although it is impossible to put a cocoon around your children, there are many measures that you can put to use, which will mitigate the danger. Where Does the Vulnerability Come From The greatest risk to our children comes from friends and family — not strangers.

Protecting children from sexual predators

Author Permission to Use Info Print PDF High-profile news stories about children and teens being sexually abused by trusted teachers, religious leaders, coaches, neighbors, and family members continue to shock parents, educators, and other caring adults across the US.

These sad stories are classic examples of how individuals can misuse their positions of trust and power to abuse and coerce kids and of how adults in responsible positions often fail to take adequate action to stop them.

How can I protect my kids? What can I teach them about protecting themselves? Despite their discomfort, their responsibility was to report what happened to the police and to follow up thoroughly to ensure that kids were safe.

If you suspect that there is a safety problem, especially involving children, take personal responsibility for doing something to address it. This means speaking up persistently and widely until effective action is taken to fix that problem.

Follow up to see what is happening. Realize that children and young people who are being abused need help and protection — and that anyone who is abusing them needs to be stopped. Make sure you know what someone is doing with your kids.

Remember that anyone can be an abuser. As parents and other caring adults, we need to face the reality that there are sexual predators who will create opportunities to be alone with kids by doing wonderful things with and for them. And, most of these offenders will seem like really nice people with excellent reputations.

Many will even provide truly important services for most of the children they encounter. However, the vulnerability of young people to anyone put into these positions of trust is why more attention needs to be paid to screening these individuals and to following up thoroughly on any hint of a problem.

Check each person out for yourself, especially if he or she is going to be alone with your child. Trust your intuition if something feels uncomfortable to you.

Watch out for someone who seems to single out certain kids for special attention and private relationships, who seeks social and recreational opportunities to be alone with kids without other adults there, or who is not open to parents and other responsible adults being fully informed about and comfortable with what is going on.

While there are obvious virtues to using cell phones and the internet, technology is simultaneously making children vulnerable and exposing them to exploitation and danger.

When in doubt, check it out! Most abusers cultivate strong relationships with children before doing anything sexual. I just said a bad word.

Protecting children from sexual predators

Pay attention to what they say. Let kids know that you care about what they are doing and want to know what is happening with them no matter how busy you are. Avoid scolding at that moment, even if the child has done something wrong. Be very clear with all children in your life that secrets about problems, touch, favors, gifts someone gives them, photos or videos, privileges, time alone with anyone, and games are not safe.

Their job is to tell you and other adults they trust instead of keeping secrets, even if someone they care about will be upset or embarrassed.

In many cases, pedophiles give kids alcohol or drugs as a way to get them to lower their inhibitions, sometimes molesting them while they are unconscious or asleep. They might then threaten their victims with getting them into trouble by telling their parents.

Please tell me about anyone whose behavior makes you uncomfortable even if we really like this person so we can figure out what to do to keep everyone safe.

Kids are more likely to be able to take actions like these when they need to if they understand their safety rules and have the chance to rehearse following these rules in a fun, age-appropriate way. Using non-sexual examples such as tickling or roughhousing, role-play with kids skills for setting boundaries on touch and teasing with people they know and care about even if someone tries to pressure them.

Using non-sexual examples such as someone hurting their feelings or playing a scary game, give kids practice on how to interrupt a busy adult with a safety problem and tell the whole story.

Four Strategies for Protecting Kids from Sexual Predators Author | Permission to Use Info | Print PDF High-profile news stories about children and teens being sexually abused by trusted teachers, religious leaders, coaches, neighbors, and family members continue to shock parents, educators, and other caring adults across the US. Get advice and information to help protect your children from dangers lurking in both the online and offline worlds. Those who sexually abuse children are drawn to settings where they can gain easy access to children, such as sports leagues, religious youth centers, clubs, and schools.

See Touch in Healthy Relationships. Additional Resources Kidpower provides these services to prepare families, schools, and organizations protect children from sexual abuse, bullying, abduction and other violence: In-person workshops for parents, teachers, and counselors as well as children and teens.

Consultation on how to integrate the Kidpower methodology and skills into the ongoing activities of schools and youth-serving organizations. You are welcome to download this Featured Article for personal use, and print one 1 copy for free — as long as you keep the PDF "as is" and do not post or share electronically, per our Permission to Use Requirements.

Protecting children from sexual predators

You will receive an email with a secure, encrypted link to download the PDF. Are you a member? October 28, Irene van der Zande, Kidpower Founder and Executive Director Kidpower Founder and Executive Irene van der Zande is a master at teaching safety through stories and practices and at inspiring others to do the same.Four Strategies for Protecting Kids from Sexual Predators Author | Permission to Use Info | Print PDF High-profile news stories about children and teens being sexually abused by trusted teachers, religious leaders, coaches, neighbors, and family members continue to shock parents, educators, and other caring adults across the US.

Protecting Children From Online Sexual Predators EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Online grooming: Issues concerning the protection of children from online sexual predators have been prominent in political and media debates in recent times. Our topic tonight is "Protecting Your Children From Sexual Predators".

Our guest, Debbie Mahoney, is author and founder of the child protection group Safeguarding Our Children-United Mothers (SOC-UM), which is a site inside the torosgazete.com Abuse Issues Community.

How to Protect Children from Sexual Predators. There is a Sexual Predator in Your Neighborhood! Guidelines to Help You Keep Your Children Safe. Tips for Protecting your Child from Sexual Predators.

There are two general ways in which you can keep your child safe from sexual predators. These are. Jan 15,  · Cyber Relationships, Internet Safety, Legal/Ethics, Predators, Protecting Children, Social Media Guidelines to Protect Children from Online Sexual Predators Internet Danger!

Chat Room. instant messaging, chat rooms and online sexual predators can harm children of all ages. Protection of Children From Sexual Predators Act of - Title I: Protection of Children From Predators - Amends the Federal criminal code to prohibit, and set penalties for, using the mail or any facility or means of interstate or foreign commerce to knowingly initiate the transmission of the name, address, telephone number, social security.

Not With My Child: How to protect your child from predators